Case Updates

It’s hard to believe the blog is over a year old now. A big thank you to everyone who has read and commented. I have some new features in the works including a Patreon. The Patreon won’t go live until there is enough content ready for it to be worth something. I would like to help defray the costs of the blog, but I feel I should have more to offer before I do. This blog, however, will always remain free.

As time passes, some of the cases need updates, because these stories are never really done.

Johnson at trial
Johnson at trial, Photo courtesy of WFAA trial coverage

The very first case I covered was Ripples in a Pond about the White Rock Lake machete murder. October 12, 2015, Thomas Johnson brutally murdered runner Dave Stevens. Due to his schizophrenia, Johnson was found incompetent to stand trial. Incompetence is different than insanity. Competency relates to the current ability of an accused to understand the charges against him and assist in his own defense. Because his mental illness had its hooks in so deep, Johnson didn’t regain competency for some time, but he was finally declared competent in 2018. He went to trial this March, entering a plea of not guilty by reason of insanity.

 

Insanity relates to the mental status of a defendant at the time he committed the offense. Texas Code of Criminal Procedure Chapter 46C  and Penal Code Chapter 8 cover Insanity as a defense. To use this special plea, the defendant must admit having committed the offense, but must prove by a preponderance of the evidence that at the time of  the crime, as a result of severe mental disease or defect, the accused did not know that his conduct was wrong.

It was undisputed that Johnson committed the crime and that he suffered from a severe mental disease–but  did he know that his conduct was wrong? The prosecution offered evidence that Johnson immediately went to call 911 and told them he had committed capital murder. The defense did not call any witnesses. They were hampered by Johnson’s decision on to testify and his own decision during trial that he would not agree that he was insane. It only took the jury a half hour to convict him. He was sentenced to life.

FatherWith tears in his eyes, Johnson’s own father told WFAA, Channel 8 news that it was the best result. His son had resisted all attempts to help him and refused his medication when allowed to be free. The only choice, for his safety and everyone else’s, was to “keep him away from other people.”

 

Lisa and Jayden
Lisa Underwood and Jayden

When I covered the Stephen Barbee case, he had just exhausted his appeals after receiving a death sentence for murdering his pregnant ex-girlfriend and her son who was only seven. For more details, see Bad Decisions. Barbee now has a date with the execution chamber, October 2, 2019. The only thing which would change that is a stay of execution which is not likely. His conviction was after the advent of the modern DNA era. Everything was thoroughly tested, he confessed, and he led police to the bodies. There have not been any suggestions he suffers from a mental defect of disease. I do not expect to see a stay of execution.

 

ReneBuried Alive remains one of the most heart-breaking stories I have covered. I remember when it happened. I was a young prosecutor and the brutality of Lisa Rene’s murder shocked me. It still shocks me. Three of the men who kidnapped, raped, and kill Lisa made plea deals to testify against the two men who were sentenced to death: Orlando Hall and Bruce Webster. At trial, Webster’s  attorney offered evidence that Webster had a terrible childhood filled with abuse and that he was mentally challenged.  Webster’s appellate attorneys uncovered new evidence that convinced the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals  to vacate the death sentence and remand the case for a new sentencing.  Prosecutors are still deciding how to handle this ruling.

Jalisco State Attorney General's OfficeIn the future I will update Wrecked, story of the “Affluenza Teen.” At this point, it’s still on-going. His mother, Tonya Couch is scheduled for trial this fall on charges she knowingly hindered his apprehension by taking him to Mexico before he could be arrested for violating his probation. I’m going to wait until after her trial for that update.

 

I’m going to take a break from the Hunting Grounds series for a couple weeks before returning to it. Instead I’m delving into a case that combines two of my favorite subjects: high school football, and true crime: the robbery spree that saw members of Dallas Carter’s state winning football team go forward not to college greatness, but to prison.

Sources:

http://www.msn.com/en-us/sports/ncaafb/ex-texas-aandm-player-found-guilty-of-machete-killing/ar-AAAK6Fg?ocid=ientp

https://www.wfaa.com/article/news/local/former-am-football-player-gets-life-in-prison-for-killing-white-rock-runner-with-machete/287-bbcebb69-f3b3-4d7f-85f1-c85df8382902

https://www.wfaa.com/article/news/jurors-will-hear-insanity-defense-in-jogger-machete-attack-trial/287-09716868-7c1b-4080-8be5-f1025194329a

https://sports.yahoo.com/former-texas-am-wr-thomas-johnson-convicted-in-murder-trial-200733197.htmlhttps://www.chron.com/sports/aggies/article/Ex-Texas-A-M-football-Thomas-Johnson-guilty-murder-13807152.php

Execution Date Set For Fort Worth Man Stephen Barbee Who Killed Pregnant Ex-Girlfriend, Her 7-Year-Old Son

https://www.washingtonpost.com/national/health-science/judge-vacates-federal-death-sentence-in-1994-texas-case/2019/06/20/c90ef742-938d-11e9-956a-88c291ab5c38_story.html?utm_term=.d53791d1e073&noredirect=on

https://www.star-telegram.com/news/local/community/arlington/article231792818.html

https://ondeathrowusa.blogspot.com/2017/04/bruce-webster-federal-death-row.html

 

 

 

 

 

The Hunting Grounds, Part Six: The Monster’s Disguise

The Hunting Grounds is a multi-part series on the predators who made Fort Worth a dangerous place to be a woman in in the 1980s. I strongly recommend you start from the beginning of the narrative. Preview sets the scene, followed by  Stranger in the Dark and Cold Hit which discusses the creation of CODIS and the first Fort Worth Cold Case Unit. The Devil you Know and Caging the Predator address the issue of serial rapists who escalate to murder, and the first killer confined under the Sexually Violent Predator Act. This post is a continuation of A Friend of the Family.


victims
Vanessa Villa, 11; Francis Williams, 30 Melissa Badillo, 23; Maria Navarro, 32;

An 11 year-old child in her own bed. A black sex worker at a truck stop. A young, Hispanic mother running errands in her neighborhood. A woman from out of town on her way back to the bus station. The four have nothing  in common, except they all knew the same man, and he would eventually kill them. He would also get away with it for more than a decade.

Although many people had fled their Northside neighborhood after the 1986 murder of Vanessa Villa (See A Friend of the Family), Melissa Badillo and her sister Sylvia Sanchez had stayed. September 1994, Melissa left her five month old daughter with Sylvia and went out to run errands. She was never seen alive again. Melissa’s half-nude body was found in in a park near Riverside. She had been raped and manually strangled. Among those who came by the house to pay respects was the elder brother of Melissa’s best friend, Juan “Johnny” Segundo. His family had lived nearby for years. The case remained unsolved and a heart-broken Sylvia raised Melissa’s daughter with only stories and a picture to keep her memory alive.

Like so many in the 1980s, Francis Williams was a casualty of the crack epidemic. Her addiction led her into sex work to survive. November 15, 1994, her nude body was found face down in a drainage ditch just blocks from a truck stop. Although the area was frequented by sex workers, it wasn’t where Francis normally worked. She was known to walk the Lancaster/Rosedale area downtown. She had been raped and  manually strangled. In an odd twist, someone had spray-painted the letters “KKK” in white on her buttocks. Police weren’t sure if this was really a racially motivated crime or just a false clue intended to lead them off path. Perhaps it was a sick joke. There was no way to know if that desecration had even come from the killer or from someone who spotted her body.

Because of her lifestyle, Francis hadn’t been reported missing. She was frequently in and out of jails and moved around. Police identified her by her fingerprints. Her mother Emma and her two sisters had seen her just two days prior. Francis had gotten out of jail that Sunday morning and come by. They were able to tell the police that she had recently been seen around town with a Hispanic man, driving a red truck. They didn’t know his name.

During this same time, Dallas PD was working on two sex worker manual strangulations where victim was left in similar circumstances, in a ditch, half dressed. Police were focused on the sex worker angle and spoke to many of the truck drivers and women who knew Francis. The men all pointed fingers at one other. One claimed to have heard someone bragging about having killed a sex worker and painted her. One claimed to have knowledge that Francis had stolen from a drug dealer.

Aerial view Williams
Aerial view of location where Francis Williams’s body was found. Photo courtesy of FWPD archives

The police weren’t the only ones who focused on Francis being a sex worker. Unlike the sensitive reporting by Melody McDonald and Deanna Boyd who told Vanessa’s story, Francis’ murder was reported on by a male reporter and the headlines were very different. “POLICE SAY BODY THAT OF PROSTITUTE” screams the headline and underneath, “Officer says records show woman had 51 citations.” Most of the article is about the problem of prostitution in the area, how truck driver’s won’t park their trucks down there because women are always knocking on the doors. There is nothing about Francis as a person, as someone who had a family who loved her. Her criminal history is all convictions for prostitution and drug possession. She didn’t have a history of theft or violence or even dealing drugs. She didn’t harm anyone. She was just a woman struggling with addiction, trying to survive.

Thankfully, police records show that they took the murder investigation seriously. They worked all the angles. On Wednesday, November 16, a truck driver saw someone throw a garbage bag out. He looked and found it was full of female clothes and a wig. He decided he should call the police. Interviews with other sex workers who knew Francis well told police they had last seen her on n on E. Lancaster, an area she was known to work. She was seen by a friend standing behind the Windsor Hotel. Like so many murders in this time, there were two many suspects and not enough evidence and Francis’ murder was added to the list of unsolved cases.

Maria Navarro wasn’t a local. She came to Fort Worth from Corpus Christi to visit friends and maybe get a new start. A mother of three, she left her children in the car of her own mother, but she didn’t abandon them. She wrote numerous letters and called regularly. Maria had her own demons, particularly cocaine. She visited her friends and made new ones, even a boyfriend that she considered serious. Her husband and the father of her children had died the year before and substance abuse had been her coping mechanism, but Maria was hopeful. An argument with another woman turned into a fistfight and Maria found herself in jail. While there, she wrote letters to her boyfriend and family about her intent to rededicate herself to starting fresh. She pled guilty, served her time and was released. Her boyfriend had a more casual view of their relationship. He liked Maria, but didn’t want anything serious. But he cared and offered to pay for a bus ticket home to Corpus Christi.

Maria was thrilled. She called her mother on June 16th and told her she was coming home and even made arrangements to pick up her children. This was her new life, her fresh start. She also called her sister and gave her the same message. She was going home. When Maria didn’t show up as planned, her mother worried. She called police up in Fort Worth and reported her daughter missing. Maria’s boyfriend didn’t hear from her again and assumed she had gotten on the bus and moved on with her life. Maria’s friend she had stayed with at the Skyline Motel didn’t see her for several days and was surprised that Maria left all her things. She worried, but decided Maria just wanted to go home that badly.

June 17, 1995, children found Maria’s body in Buck Sansom Park. They were there to play baseball when they found her body in the bushes. There was “insect activity” that drew their attention, most likely flies at that time of year. She was nude from the waist down, wearing only a tank top and sandals. She had been raped and manually strangled. Like Francis, Maria was identified by fingerprints from her recent trip to jail. Police then matched her name to the missing persons report filed by her mother. Maria’s friend was able to describe some unique tattoos and jewelry which further confirmed the identity of the body. At the time, police were convinced her murder was related to that of a sex worker named Patricia Apodoca who was murdered the same day.

They questioned everyone, but could find no links between Maria and Patricia. Maria was not involved with sex work and although some people knew both women, there was no indication they knew one another. Patricia’s murder remains unsolved, or if it was solved, I was unable to find any record of it. Police took a hard look at Maria’s boyfriend, but he passed several polygraphs and seemed truly distraught. Her mother and sister took on the task of raising Maria’s three children. The family was impoverished, unable to raised the funds for a headstone leaving Maria Navarro in an unmarked grave.

September 4, 1995, Juan Mesa Segundo pled guilty to his third DWI which made the charge a felony. He was sentenced to 5 years in TDC (Texas Department of Corrections). His brother recalled picking him up in 2000 when he was released. He said his brother seemed to have aged since last seen.  He took his brother home to live with him in Keene Texas.  While in Keene, Segundo converted to Seventh Day Adventist and married a Filipino woman. For five years, Segundo lived under the radar.

Manny Reyes
Now Retired, Fort Worth Detective Manny Reyes

Then, in 2004 Texas required all convicted offenders to submit DNA to CODIS. In 2005, the state ordered all incarcerated felony offenders to be added to the system even if their convictions predated 2004. (See Preview for the use of DNA in prosecutions and use of CODIS to solve crimes). Detective Manny Reyes evaluated cold cases for biological evidence and submitted them to CODIS for possible DNA matches. Among the first cases Reyes sent was the very first murder case he worked: Vanessa Villa. The eleven year-old’s murder had haunted him and for 19 years he remained in contact with the family. Other cases with biological evidence were Frances Williams and Maria Navarro. At the time, criminologists didn’t think they had enough DNA in Melissa Badillo’s case.

The envelopes he got in return looked like any other mail, but they contained life changing information. He had an answer for Vanessa’s killer. The semen on her sheets and body belonged to a Juan Mesa Segundo. He had a name, an identity for the faceless monster. A warrant was quickly drafted. Vanessa’s family was shocked. They had lost track of “Johnny” Segundo over the years but he was a friend of the family. They had allowed him into their home.

Detectives quickly learned Segundo was not in custody. He was living in Johnson County which is just to the south of Tarrant County. The moved in an arrested him. In what would become a hallmark of his incarceration, Segundo denied knowing anything. He even claimed not to know who Vanessa was. Under pressure, he finally admitted knowing the family and having been in the home, but still denied knowing the child whose funeral he attended.

More envelopes came and Segundo’s DNA was matched to both Francis Williams’ and Maria Navarro’s murders. Detectives were shocked because they had never linked the crimes. Detective Boetcher, who had worked Francis’ case went to see her mother in person and let her know the killer was in custody. Segundo’s photo was shown to many sex workers from the area and they recognized his face as someone who had been around. They didn’t know his name, but multiple women picked his face out of photospreads as someone from the area. He was a local guy, mild-mannered, soft-spoken. The monster had been in disguise.

Melissa Badillo’s sister was shocked by the arrest and convinced he had something to do with her sister’s murder. He was someone they knew well. “We came from the same barrio,” she said.

In spite of the DNA matches, Segundo’s new church and community rallied around him. His wife and other church members visited him almost daily, convinced of his innocence. When jailors search Segundo’s cell, they found weapons, a toothbrush sharpened to a deadly point and other items, including two photos of young girls around 8-13 years of age.  One of the church members who had visited him regularly admitted he had asked for photos of her daughter, a girl near the same age as Vanessa. He told her he wanted to draw a picture of her daughter for her as a gift. Under questioning, she admitted he didn’t ask for pictures of son. He had never drawn the picture of her daughter but she insisted there was no harm in having the picture. The identity of the other girl was never found.

In 2006, Segundo went to trial for Vanessa’s murder. His lawyers did what they could to suggest the DNA was contaminated, but the jury convicted him. Everyone knew the real issue was whether he would receive the death penalty. The jury was told about his other crimes, the two known murders, the burglaries with intent so commit sexual assault, the long history of alcoholism.

The defense presented evidence of a difficult, chaotic childhood. The family had been very impoverished and the kids were shuffled around to different homes including an orphanage before moving to Fort Worth with an alcoholic mother and an abusive step-father. One of Segundo’s brothers testified that he suffered a severe head injury as a toddler. Segundo’s church members and family all said he was changed man. He had been out of prison for five years and–to their knowledge–hadn’t offended on anyone. Of course, they didn’t realize he was raping and killing back in the 80s and 90s. They said he was sober now and a productive citizen. He was active in the church.

A neurologist, Dr. Hopewell testified that  Segundo had an “extensive history of inhalant and alcohol abuse coupled with his head injury and difficult childhood caused him to be memory impaired although not ‘mentally retarded’.   She tested Segundo’s  IQ at 75, and that he had “very poor” insight, “poor” judgment, and “significant difficulty” with executive functioning.

The prosecution had more evidence that had never been made public before the trial. A 21 year-old woman who testified that Segundo dated her mother when she was very young, about 5. He molested her and forced her to perform oral sex on him.

While some family members testified for Segundo, others did not. A woman who identified herself on public message boards as Stephanie Hernandez wrote there in 2006:

I’m sorry to say that I’m actually related to this monster and if it weren’t for my father. He probably would’ve killed my mother & I. My mom stated she was surprised he didn’t kill us we lived in the same household as he did at one time. He hated my mom & was jealous of my birth. I have been reading on these victims and I am very sorry for your tragic e ENTs. Needless to say I do understand what you are going through. I too was a victim of molestation from a step family member. And do recall them two got along very well. I came forward and saved lives. I do wonder sometimes why didn’t he just end it with me cause I live with that pain for the rest of my life. I hope he is put down soon he’s a waste of society. There’s no way he will make it out here alive. May God wrap his arms tightly around these victims and their families. Justice is only halfway served while he sits awake with no remorse. Take him god & make this world a better place. God bless

They jury weighed the cost of what he had done and sentenced Segundo to death.

In 2010, a criminologist with the Tarrant County Medical Examiner’s Office realized that DNA had progressed enough that they could now test scrapings that came from under Melissa Badillo’s nails. She had fought her attacker. DNA confirmed that her attacker had been Juan Mesa Segundo. Because Segundo was already on Death Row, he was never formally charged with Melissa’s death.

Segundo was scheduled to die in 2018, but he was granted a stay based upon his claim that he is intellectually disabled. The case is now in limbo pending further investigation of his mental status. At the same time the Fort Worth Star-Telegram printed  heartbreaking interviews with Vanessa and Melissa’s families, describing how their lives had been damaged by Segundo.

Segundo4Segundo has refused to speak about the crimes. Even family members close to him say he has never spoken to them. Whatever he knows, he is keeping it hidden inside, just as he keeps everything about his true, monstrous self hidden behind the disguise of a family friend.

 

 

Next Week I will update some stories previously covered, including a conviction, a stay of execution, and a new date with the death chamber.

 

SOURCE NOTES:

https://www.myplainview.com/news/article/DNA-links-convict-to-1995-slaying-8692651.php

http://murderpedia.org/male.S/s/segundo-juan.htm

https://caselaw.findlaw.com/tx-court-of-criminal-appeals/1014059.html

http://www.cncpunishment.com/forums/showthread.php?1610-Juan-Ramon-Meza-Segundo-Texas-Death-Row

https://www.star-telegram.com/news/local/community/fort-worth/article219680490.html

https://www.dallasobserver.com/news/caught-cold-6405623

https://www.lubbockonline.com/filed-online/2011-07-02/police-say-dna-links-1994-slaying-23-year-old-woman-death-row-inmate

 

 

 

 

 

The Hunting Grounds, Part Five: A Friend of the Family

The Hunting Grounds is a multi-part series on the predators who made Fort Worth a dangerous place to be a woman in in the 1980s. I strongly recommend you start from the beginning of the narrative. Preview sets the scene, followed by  Stranger in the Dark and Cold Hit which discusses the creation of CODIS and the first Fort Worth Cold Case Unit. The Devil you Know and Caging the Predator address the issue of serial rapists who escalate to murder, and the first killer confined under the Sexually Violent Predator Act.


Vanessa Villa_familySomething was bothering Vanessa Villa on August 3, 1986. The 11 year-old Fort Worth Worth girl had been out of sorts all day and now she didn’t want dinner. She didn’t want to go to the store with her mother and aunt. She just wanted to lie in bed listening to a cassette of sad, Spanish songs. She might have been nervous about the school year that was about to start. School was hard for Vanessa. She was bubbly and outgoing and teachers liked her enough to make her an office helper, but her English was limited and so even though she was a bright child who loved art and history, she struggled. At times, she wanted to leave and go back to Mexico. She wrote in her diary, “Momma take me from this place. I’m scared.” But at other times she dreamed of being a cheerleader and had exchanged kisses with a boy. She lived a normal life for a girl on the Northside.

The Northside of Fort Worth has a long history of being a tight knit Mexican community. School might be hard, but Vanessa’s family had found a welcoming home in the neighborhood. Their extended family was all here. Vanessa made money selling Western belts and boots at the Bernal Flea Market, something she did earlier that day. Her friends and family remember her as not being her cheerful self. That night, she excused herself from the dinner table without eating. Vanessa’s mother stopped by her bedroom to check on her before leaving. The baby needed diapers and another child need new shoes for school. Vanessa was lying on the bed wearing blue jean shorts, listening to the sad music as a fan hummed in her open window, keeping the heat at bay. She repeated that didn’t want to go. Her seventeen year old brother was in his room, so her mother let Vanessa and the youngest children stay home while ran her errands.

Vanessa’s mother and aunt weren’t gone long, just a trip to the store and maybe stopping to talk to friends. Upon arriving home, the first thing Vanessa’s mother noticed was that her bedroom door was closed, which was strange because it was hot. The door had been open when they left in order to let the air flow through. She opened the door and was startled to find her daughter naked from the waist down. Her first instinct was to snap, “Cover yourself up!” But on closer look , she realized something was very wrong. Then she started screaming and Vanessa’s brother ran into the room.

It was a crime that shocked the community. There had been a steady creep of the problems facing the rest of the city, but a eleven year-old girl raped and strangled in her own bed? Chris Cook, a senior detective was called out to the scene, but he quickly called for another detective, one who spoke Spanish. Manny Reyes would always recall the first murder case he worked.

Vanessa had been brutally attacked, with ligature marks around her neck and half-moon cuts from finger nails dug in her thighs, yet no one had heard anything. Outside her window, police found a white bucket, the type markets used to sell pickles. The bucket was turned over and the fan had been pushed out of Vanessa’s window. Police believed her attacker had come in through that window.

At first, police pursued leads hard. There was a neighbor with a history of sexually abusing children, but he proved to have an alibi. This was the same year the discovery of DNA was announced. The idea of using it solves crimes was far away. The best police could do was test the semen for secretions. The neighbor was excluded from being the killer, but that didn’t bring police any closer to answers. Vanessa was laid to rest in a dove grey coffin with a lace veil over her face. Reyes watched people shuffle past to pay their respects and he wondered if one of them had done it.

Segundo1

The fifth name in the visitation book at the funeral is written in shaky hand, Mr. and Mrs. Juan Segundo. Juan and his wife, Rosa Maria were friends of the family. Rosa Maria worked with Vanessa’s mother at a nursing home. Juan, who went by Johnny, used to visit there until he was accused of molesting one of the residents and banned from being there.

Johnny was considered harmless by most people. He was small and soft spoken, but Rosa Maria knew he had a darker side. He drank heavily and could be abusive. In 1983, he came home covered with blood and refused to talk about it.  She went out to his car, looking for clues. Under the seat she found a woman’s purse. Segundo had been in and out of jail, mostly for marijuana and drunk driving, but also burglary. If she had any suspicions then about just how dangerous her husband was, Rosa Maria kept them to herself. She did leave him soon after.

People were eager to leave the neighborhood after Vanessa was killed. Too much violence and they were now suspicious of each other. Police were sure the killer was local. Everyone knew each other on the Northside. Vanessa’s killer was able to walk up to her house and away again without anyone noticing even though the heat of the evening had driven many outside. He belonged. A stranger would have been seen. Without any meaningful leads, the police moved on to new crimes and the tight knit community broke apart, but no one forgot, not Vanessa’s family or friends, and certainly not that young detective.

October 6, 1987, Irene K. was separated from her husband and staying with a friend on North Houston Street. She woke in the night to the feeling of someone touching her. Startled, she turned on a lamp to find a man with his pants down, kneeling over her. She screamed and he began punching her in the face. The man seemed very drunk to her as she fought back. Fortunately, Irene wasn’t alone. Irene’s screaming brought her friend running. The friend also fought the man who ran off and the women immediately called the police. Juan Segundo might have gotten away with the brazen attack if the friend hadn’t recognized him. She had worked with Segundo and considered him a nuisance. He was was always “hitting on” her and making sexual comments. Perhaps Segundo was actually looking for the friend that night when he broke in.

Thanks to her friend having recognized him, a warrant was issued for Segundo. Police were already looking for him because he had just made bond on his most recent DWI. Segundo was quickly arrested and charged with Burglary with intent to commit sexual assault. He was convicted and sentenced to 10 years in prison on June 28, 1988. Thanks to overcrowding and mandatory early release, he was back out in less than a year.

Ripley Arnold
Ripley Arnold Housing Complex before it was torn down in 2003.

His parole didn’t last very long. Sharon H. lived in the Ripley Arnold Housing Complex right across the street from the Tarrant County Courthouse, the very place Segundo had pled guilty to trying to rape Irene K.

Like Irene, Sharon woke to a naked man in her room. To keep her from screaming, her grabbed her around the throat and began strangling her. Later police would discover that he had removed a window pane to make entry into her bedroom. Sharon fought Segundo and was able to get free. Ripley Arnold Housing was a series of duplexes that were close on top of one another. Her screams brought neighbors running. They weren’t able to catch Segundo but they got a good look at him and were able to tell police who he was. Segundo was well known in the neighborhood. As one man told the police, “Johnny gets crazy when he drinks.”

How a convicted sex offender who had attacked a woman after being out of prison for less than a year was allowed to plead guilty to a misdemeanor is a real mystery, but that is exactly what happened. Although Segundo was again charged with Burglary with intent to commit sexual assault and was eligible to be punished as a Habitual Offender, meaning he could have gotten anywhere from 25 years to Life, Segundo was only given a sentence of one year.

Segundo’s parole was revoked and he was sent back to prison where he was again released in 1993. Five days later he was arrested for threatening another man with a gun at a bar over a woman. He was released on bond because the courts were slow. Then in 1995, while drunk Segundo ran a red light and led police on a high speed chase through the streets of Fort Worth. He was once again released on bond. This DWI, Segundo’s third, was a felony. Apparently, DWI is more serious than rape, because when he pled guilty on September 14, 1995, he was sentenced to five years.

While on bond for the felony that would send him back to the pen, Segundo killed at least three times, crimes that wouldn’t be revealed for a decade, not until Fort Worth created it’s first Cold Case Unit and assigned a veteran detective, Manny Reyes, who had never forgotten that first case he had been assigned. For 19 years he had stayed in touch with Vanessa Villa’s family and when CODIS made DNA a formidable weapon in solving old crimes, hers was one of the very first cases he sent off for testing.

The results would shock everyone. Without DNA, Fort Worth police would never have discovered that four seemingly disparate crimes were actually the work of a serial killer and that he was loose on the streets, free to kill again.

Coming soon: The Monster’s Disguise.

 

SOURCE NOTES:

https://www.dallasobserver.com/news/caught-cold-6405623

https://www.lubbockonline.com/filed-online/2011-07-02/police-say-dna-links-1994-slaying-23-year-old-woman-death-row-inmate

http://murderpedia.org/male.S/s/segundo-juan.htm

https://law.justia.com/cases/texas/court-of-criminal-appeals/2008/17554.html

https://www.star-telegram.com/news/local/community/fort-worth/article219680490.html

https://www.star-telegram.com/news/local/community/fort-worth/article219680490.html#storylink=cpy

There are numerous other articles, especially from the Fort Worth Star-Telegram from reporters Melody McDonald and Deanna Boyd. Many of these articles are not online and must be accessed through Fort Worth Public Library Archives.

 

 

Childhood Interrupted: The Shakeisha Lloyd Story

The adults in Shakeisha Lloyd’s brief life failed her. It’s not that they didn’t love her. She was very loved. It’s not that they weren’t doing their best. They tried. But the truth is that they utterly failed to protect her resulting in her death at the age of ten, just a day after she completed 4th grade. Surviving family members remember her as a sweet, cheerful little girl who loved singing.

 

Shakeisha lived with her extended family in the historic Stop Six neighborhood of Fort Worth, Texas. Stop Six is primarily an African-American community that was once the sixth stop on the Northern Texas Traction Company, a trolley line that ran between Fort Worth and Dallas. They’re best known as the home of the Dunbar Wildcats and their multiple basketball state championships under the guidance of legendary coach Robert Hughes. If she had survived, Shakeisha would have gone to school there. Instead, her mother met a man named Edward Lewis Lagrone.

Like so many inner city, blue collar communities, Stop Six was ravaged by drugs and gangs in the 80s and 90s like they were natural disasters that laid waste to families and the infrastructure. In 1985, Shakeisha’ s mother began dating Lagrone. Allegedly he made a living as a cook, but everyone knew Lagrone’s real job was as the local drug dealer. Crack had ferocious grip on Stop Six and Lagrone was deep in the culture. Pamela Lloyd only dated Lagrone for six months, but that was enough for him to ingratiate himself to the family. He would come by to visit with the children.

lagrone2
Edward Lewis Lagrone

No one questioned why a grown man would be so invested in the children of a woman he briefly dated. As for Pamela, she was struggling with her own addiction to crack and Lagrone was her supplier. She was willing to ignore everything else to keep him closer. There were eight people living in Shakeisha’s house. She had a older brother, Charles, a baby sister, her mother, her uncle Dempsey, and two elderly great aunts, seventy-six-year-old Carolina “Caola” Lloyd and eighty-three-year-old Zenobia Anderson. Other family members were frequently there. Shakeisha was especially close to another great aunt and uncle, Beverly and Billy Lloyd. Their daughter Kendra was the exact same age as Shakeisha. Kendra was her cousin and her best friend in the world.

In spite of there being so many people around, we know Lagrone had plenty of alone time with little Shakeisha. In 1991, Pamela noticed physical changes in her daughter that concerned her. She was gaining weight and her breasts were growing. One night after her bath, Shakeisha told Pamela, “Mommy, something is moving around inside of me.” Pamela took her daughter to the hospital for an examination and learned that her 10 year child was 17 weeks pregnant.

Shakeisha admitted to her mother that Lagrone had been raping her for two years and that he said he would kill her if she told. She could remember nine different times she had been raped by Lagrone, but it’s hard to know how much occurred. Child predators spend time getting close to a child and gaining their trust. The goal is to have access, but to also ensure that the child doesn’t tell. The process of gradually escalating intimacy and control is called “grooming” and frequently includes lavishing attention on lonely children.

The predator starts out with little things, kissing or cuddling before moving into fondling and ultimately full intercourse. Threats and guilt are used to maintain control of the child. The child victims are often conflicted. How can someone make them feel so good and yet so bad at the same time? They believe from all the attention that this person must love them. If they tell about the bad parts, they’re harming this person who loves them. As with any confession, the longer they silent, the harder it becomes to tell. They become afraid that no one will believe them.  Shakeisha had told no one. Not even her cousin.

Pamela wanted to do the right thing. She reported him to the police. But she also contacted Lagrone. At first he denied “messing with” Shakeisha and hung up on her. But later he called back and apologized. He said he was sorry for what he had done and that he would take care of the baby. She told him she was pressing charges.

The next day, she instructed Shakeisha to call Lagrone’s beeper, fearing that he might not call her back, but he would call Shakeisha. He did call back and she told him Shakeisha need to have an abortion which would cost $895. He said he would pay.
May 29th was the end of the school year. Shakeisha should have been looking forward to the summer and 5th grade. She should have been riding her bike or playing with Barbies. She should have been giggling with Kendra and dancing around singing as she loved to do. Instead, her mother was negotiating with Shakeisha’s rapist to pay for her abortion. Lagrone offered Pamela $1,000 to pay for the abortion and another $500 just for her. All she had to do was withdraw her complaint. He told her he would be by on Thursday with the money.

Pamela didn’t withdraw the complaint. She was trying to do the right thing by her daughter. She had brought this man into their lives and allowed him access to her children. She was going to protect her daughter now. But communicating with Lagrone would prove a fatal mistake. She should have known better. She really should have.

Lagrone was more than just a drug dealer. He had already been to prison before. Lagrone was already a convicted murderer.

Lagrone1

On October 6, 1976, Lagrone shot and killed a man named Michael Anthony Jones in a dispute. He was sentenced to 20 years. While on parole for this offense, he began dating Pamela. In 1990, he has several pending arrests for dealing drugs and was facing more prison time. He was also under investigation for a double homicide committed in December of 1990. Someone broke into an apartment with a shotgun and killed a Clifton Demerson, 39 and Mary Demerson Daniel, 40. According to police, a note in Mary’s possession implicated Lagrone.

This was the man Pamela let into the lives of her family, her vulnerable children and fragile elderly women. She wasn’t bothered by Lagrone being on parole. At the time, she was newly paroled herself after serving time for aggravated robbery with a deadly weapon. She was deep into her addiction. Her uncle Billy Lloyd warned her about Lagrone. Everyone knew he was a dangerous man. But Pamela just knew that he brought her drugs. She would later comment that she thought he was great with children because he bought lots of presents to the children of the people he sold drugs to. He lavished attention and gifts on the kids of parents whose minds were clouded with drugs.

Although he was a convicted murderer who had threatened to kill the child victim of his new sexual assault charge, Lagrone hadn’t yet been arrested. Arlington Police Department were aware he lived in their city and had the warrant, but they just hadn’t gotten around to it yet citing “a heavy caseload.”

After the conversation where Pamela refused to drop the charges, Lagrone had his new girlfriend Anetta Daniel go with him to the Winchester Gun Store. He couldn’t legally buy a gun, but he gave her the money to purchase a double-barrel, pistol-grip, slide-action Winchester shotgun. She brought the gun out to him and he put it in the trunk of his car.

The next day was May 30, 1991. Pamela woke up around 4:00 am and went to get a drink of water. She was startled by a banging on the door demanding to be let in. Shakeisha’s brother later said he recognized the voice and begged him not to answer the door, but Dempsey Lloyd opened the door to find Lagrone standing there. Dempsey asked Lagrone what he wanted at that hour. In response, Lagrone shot him. Dempsey grappled with Lagrone for the shotgun, but he was weakening quickly.

Lagrone wrestled the shotgun away and went into the first bedroom. There he found Caola Lloyd. Caola was suffering from terminal cancer and was blind and mostly deaf. Lagrone executed the elderly woman with a single shot.

From there he went into the kitchen where he found Zenobia Andersons washing out some clothing. He also executed her with a single shot.

“Run, Mama” Shakeisha cried out. She and Charles were also running for cover, but first Shakeisha stopped to hide her 19 month old baby sister. This altruistic act probably cost her life as Lagrone caught up with her. Ten year-old Shakeisha threw up her hands to shield herself. When Lagrone shot, the bullet traveled through her hands, dismembering fingers and slammed into her cheek, exiting her jaw on the opposite side. He then placed the gun to the back of her neck and pulled the trigger a second time.

On the way out, he leveled the gun again at Dempsey. Dempsey begged for his life, but Lagrone shot him again anyway. Incredibly, Dempsey survived to identify Lagrone as the shooter. Pamela and Charles would also identify him. He was arrested almost immediately. Although there were three living victims and extensive forensics, Lagrone would deny he was the shooter. He also denied being the man who had impregnated Shakeisha, but unlike Lagrone, DNA doesn’t lie. He was the father.

 

At trial, Lagrone put a witness who testified that another person was bragging about the murder. Lagrone’s grown son Erik Williams, AKA Omar Anderson. His son wasn’t the most credible witness, having shot three men in three incidents, one of whom had died. That’s right. Just five months after the Lloyd family murders, Lagrone’s son also killed a man. At the time he testified for his father, he was a known gang member and drug dealer who was under indictment for murder. The jury rejected his testimony in favor of more credible evidence.

After the conviction, the jury heard more about Lagrone’s past including the drug dealing and the previous murder. They also heard testimony from two sisters, both aged fifteen at the time who had been abducted at gunpoint by Lagrone who sexually assaulted and terrorized them in 1986. He threatened them before releasing them and they didn’t tell until he safely behind bars.

The jury sentenced Lagrone to death in just 25 minutes. The violence and drugs didn’t stop there. They continued stalking this community and this family. Lagrone’s son is now serving a life sentence for the murder he was convicted of. Pamela’s addiction was too big to ignore. After Shakeisha’s murder, it only increased. She married the father of her baby girl, but he was also a violent man. In 1997 she shot and killed her husband Gene Tutt. She said it was self-defense. A plea agreement of five years was agreed on in 1999. This meant she was incarcerated on February 12, 2004, date Edward Lewis Lagrone was finally set for execution.

Charles also couldn’t be there. He, too, had fallen prey to the scourge of drugs, dying of an overdose at the age of 22. Shakeisha’s beloved aunt and uncle Beverly and Billy attended the execution as did Kendra, now 24. Lagrone was defiant to the end, refusing to admit responsibility and refusing to apologize. Kendra wept bitterly in front of reporters. She said she didn’t want to hate another person, but he had raped and killed her best friend. She was disappointed that he couldn’t at least apologize. Her father, Billy expressed relief that Lagrone would never again harm another person.
Pamela said before her release that she now accepted responsibility for her role and was ready for a change. She was ready to step away from drugs and men who had dragged her down. Upon release, she left the state and now resides in Missouri. I hope she has found her way.

When I look at the picture of Shakeisha, I’m filled with rage. She deserved better from the adults in her life. Her face is so innocent, so joyous. What a waste of a sweet, precious life.

Source Notes: The following are all sources I have used in this article, particularly murderpedia and clarkprosecutor, both of which list numerous other sources they relied on.

http://murderpedia.org/male.L/l1/lagrone-edward-lewis.htm
http://www.clarkprosecutor.org/html/death/US/lagrone896.htm
http://txexecutions.org/reports/318.asp
http://www.ca5.uscourts.gov/opinions/unpub/02/02-10976.0.wpd.pdf
https://texasattorneygeneral.gov/oagnews/release.php?id=366
https://groups.google.com/forum/#!msg/alt.thebird.copwatch/Z1WrIvhIvB0/AZVH8Di2b90J
http://caselaw.findlaw.com/tx-court-of-criminal-appeals/1323216.html
https://www.myplainview.com/news/article/Convicted-killer-of-10-year-old-he-impregnated-8770534.php

Slayer’s Book of Death: Diary of Wannabe Serial Killer

 

WARNING: This article contains graphic and upsetting descriptions of human and animal mutilations.  There are some photos of animal skulls and maggots. I chose not to use the crime scene photos because of their horrific nature, but at the end I will link to an episode of Forensic Files which does show the photos. Use your own discretion.

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Jason Eric Massey

We know a lot these days about what makes a serial killer. There are always outliers, but we know they often have horrific childhoods, particularly early childhood. Jason Eric Massey was born January 7, 1973 to parents with severe substance abuse issues. His father abandoned them immediately. His mother was young alcoholic and abusive. The birth of her first child didn’t affect her lifestyle. She would leave her toddler son in the car while she went into clubs. Two years later, she added a daughter. She beat them severely with a wooden paddle or a belt for any minor infraction. She kept the food in her room. If she found them sneaking in after food, she’d beat them. She moved constantly, staying just a step ahead of landlords looking for payment. At times they were homeless, living in her car. Jason and his siblings would show up at school as thin, hungry, dirty children with unexplained bruises.

Then there were the men. His mother brought a constant stream of men into their lives, often leaving the children alone with these men. It’s not surprising that one of them sexually assaulted Massey. By 9 years of age, Massey was bigger and stronger enough to take out his intense anger on those smaller than he was. He savagely beat a younger child with a tree branch. He also moved on to animal torture.

In the 1970s and 80s, there was a lot of discussion about what came to be known as the McDonald’s Triad, a purported predictor of homicide and sexual sadism. The Triad was animal cruelty, bed wetting, and arson. We now know that those are not predictors of violence, but rather indicators of extreme child abuse. They’re still huge, red warning flags because severe childhood abuse is one of the known contributing factors in serial killers.

Shortly after the beating of the younger child, Massey strangled and mutilated a cat. For the rest of his life, he would engaged in animal torture and murder. He was moving into his preteen years and the mutilation and torture would become twisted into his sexual fantasies. By fourteen, he was drinking and taking drugs and fantasizing about demons and power. He developed a fascination with fires and started numerous small ones.

In high school, he became obsessed with a girl who didn’t return his feelings. Massey had no notion of normal relationships. He began stalking the girl, calling her house. He killed her dog and painted the blood on her car. He had branched out from just cats to dogs and also cows, keeping their skulls as trophies.

It’s believed that around this time he started keeping a journal. His mother found it when he was 18 and had her son committed. If the entries were anything like his later ones, it’s no wonder. Unfortunately, he was soon released and immediately began again with the animal mutilations. He frequently talked about killing young girls, writing about them in the same way he described his animal killings, but people who knew him blew off the talk as self-aggrandizement. Sure he idolized Charles Manson, Ted Bundy, and Henry Lee Lucas, but that didn’t mean Massey was a serial killer.

But he wanted to be one.

In fact, that was his plan. He wanted to be the famous serial killer of all time, so he practiced on animals, keeping his trophies in a cooler, and he plotted and planned until he found his first victim. In 1993, Massey met 13 year old Christina Benjamin. Christina innocently flirted back with Massey. He was smitten with her. July of that year, Massey told his friend Christopher Nowlin that he had met a girl and was in love. He said he wanted to kill her, carve her up like one of his animals.  He was stopped by police for a traffic offense. In the car he had knives and the body of a dead cat with a rope tied around his neck.

July 23, 1993, James King hear a sound late at night, a car beeping its horn. He looked outside and saw his 14 year old son Brian run out to talk to the driver of a tan car. James went to the restroom. When he returned, the car was gone and he assumed Brian had gone with him. It wasn’t until the next morning that he realized his 13 year old step-daughter Christina was gone as well. James King and his wife Donna Benjamin waited to see if the kids would return because at that time, police didn’t worry about missing teenagers. They would “turn up.” When Brian and Christina stayed gone for a full day, James and Donna reported them missing.

Brian King and Christina Benjamin

 

July 28th, Police responded to a call of animal cruelty in Telico, Texas in Ellis County. Ellis is located just below Dallas. It’s the bottom right of the counties which ring Tarrant and Dallas, and   the US Census counts it as part of the DFW Metroplex statistically. Ellis is largely still rural, but in 1993, it was especially so. On that date, the Ellis County Sheriff Department arrived to find a mutilated calf behind a pizza restaurant. A young, blond male had been seen running away and he left behind his car, a tan sedan that was towed. At the time, they had no clue it might be related to the disappearance of two teens.

subaru

July 29th, just a day later, there was another shocking discovery in Telico. Next to a remote highway, work crews found the nude body of a young girl. She had been shot with a .22 pitsol,  stabbed, decapitated and her hands removed. Both head and hands were missing. Her body had been shockingly mutilated. She was disemboweled, her body transected by long incisions like an autopsy that exposed her orgrans. Her thighs and genitals had long, intricate carvings. Her nipples had been cut off. The extensive injuries made identification difficult. The usual methods of dental records or fingerprints were unavailable.

Not far, a second body was discovered. 14 year-old Brian had been shot twice in the back of the head with a .22 pistol.  His body was fully clothed and not mutilated. In Brian’s wallet was his library card. The sheriff’s department contacted his father who told them that his son was missing. Then asked about Christina. Was she the girl with him? It seemed likely. Donna and James told the police that Christina had recently broken a foot. X-ray records confirmed the fractures of Christina and the Telico Jane Doe matched.

In addition, there was long, blonde hair caught on nearby barbed wire that was consistent with Christina’s. DNA would later provide the more definitive confirmation. Due to the small size and rural nature of Ellis County, Dallas County Crime Lab provided assistance. At the crime scene, they discovered a blond hair on Brian King’s leg that did not match him or Christina. Stuck to his sneaker was a single tan fiber belonging to the interior of a Japanese-make vehicle.

Meanwhile, police were processing the tan Subaru seized during the calf mutilation investigation. Inside they found three blood stains. In the trunk was a blood stained leaf. There was a roll of duct tape with blood on it, a hammer and a hatchet, a receipt for .22 ammo. A bracelet was dropped by the blond man running from the scene of the calf mutilaion with the name JASON on it. He might as well have left a big neon sign behind.

Almost immediately, police received an annonymous call that they should look at Jason Massey. Considering he went around talking about how he wanted to murder and mutilate young girls, it’s not shocking. They heard he had been seen the day of the murders at a local car wash vacuuming his tan Subaru. When the story broke on the news, the owner remembered Massey being there and called police who seized the contents of the carwash vacuum. In them, they found an appointment card from Massey’s probation officer and multiple strands of Christina’s hair in a bloody red bandana.

 

To be certain which day the murders had occurred, they turned to a forensic entomologist. He examined the maggots and hatched some of his own in order to give an accurate age of the larvae found on the bodies. By doing this, he could deciseively say Christina and Brian had been deceased for two days. They were killed the same night they left in a tan car.

maggots

Police learned that Massey’s cousin owned a .22 caliber pistol that Massey had “borrowed.” Multiple people had seen Massey with the gun. The Walmart clerk who had sold the bullets, two knives, and handcuffs to Massey was able to ID him. At Massey’s house, police found the handcuffs, knife box, and newspaper articles he had cut out about the crime.

The fiber on Brian’s shoe matched the interior of Massey’s car. The blood on the car seats was tested and confirmed to come from Brian and Christine. Forensics and witness interviews painted a grim picture of the crime. Christine had agreed to sneak out and meet Massey. Perhaps she was nervous enough to ask her brother to come with them.

Perhaps she thought Brian could protect her from Massey. Instead, Massey drove them to a secluded location and shot Brian twice in the back of the head while still sitting in the car. Christine jumped out and tried to run, but Massey caught her and brought her back. There was no evidence of sexual assault. That isn’t where he got his pleasure. He shot her and dragged her back, then stabbed her multiple times. The gunshot did not kill her. It’s not known which of the other injuries were fatal. She was likely dead before the worst of the mutilations occurred.

Massey smirked during his arrest. He relished the media frenzy that followed, basking in the attention. There was a mountain of evidence, but in tiny pieces. Put together, the pieces made a whole picture, but conviction wasn’t a sure thing. It was a circumstantial case, even if the circumstances were damning.  Then during the trial, a bombshell. A hunter in the woods stumbled upon a rusty cooler. Opening it revealed Massey’s trophy case. In the cooler were 31 skulls of animals, and a set of four spiral notebooks. These notebooks bore the title “Slayer’s Book of Death” and they were the ramblings, the fantasies, the plans and recollections of Jason Massey. It was his blueprint for murder and mutilation. He detailed his crimes against animals. He particularly liked strangling them and decapitating them so he could keep the skulls. Massey wrote that killing gave him an “adrenaline rush, a high, a turn on, a love to mutilate.”

Massey wrote of his admiration for famous killers, particularly Bundy, Manson, and Lucas. He aspired to be even more, the most famous serial killer of all time. He set a goal of 700 victims in 20 years, working out how many people he would have to kill a month to hit his total. He named girls he wanted to add to the list. The journal starts with his fantasies of rape, torture, mutilation, and cannibalism, but then moves into specific planning.” Massey wrote that he wanted “to grab society by the throat and shake ’em with terror until they’re awake and realize what’s up so they will remember who I am, when and why I came their way.”

Both sides only had a single day to process the new evidence. For the state, it was exactly what they needed, a glimpse into the mind of a wannabe serial killer. For the defense, it was devastating. The jury only needed 15 minutes to convict Massey of capital murder. After the verdict, the jury learned more about Massey’s background and his crimes against animals and robberies. He was sentenced to death.

Massey was executed April 3, 2001. As so many before and after him, he claimed to have found religion. Maybe he had. He grew from a boy to a man on death row. He expressed remorse and I can only hope it was genuine. He apologized to the families of Christine and Brian. He told them that “she didn’t suffer as much as you think” and said that he had thrown her hands and head in the Trinity River. He apologized to his family and said he was relieved his journey was at an end. “Tonight I dance in the streets of gold. Let he who is without sin cast the first stone.”

Would Massey have become a serial killer? He certainly had all the makings. Horrific childhood. Severe substance abuse. Animal mutilation. Fire starting. Sadistic sexual fantasies. At the trial, several experts testified that there isn’t a known treatment for such a strong case of anti-social personality disorder. As a society, all we can do is warehouse them or put them down like rabid dogs for our own safety. Maybe someday we will progress enough that we can do something meaningful to stop the process. The warning signs were there. If we can’t unmake the monster we have to stop him from being created. Otherwise, innocents like Christina and Brian suffer, just two kids who never had the chance to grow up because wannabe serial killer.

 

 

 

 

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DvnSIR6eIH8

http://www.murderpedia.org/male.M/m1/massey-jason.htm

http://www.clarkprosecutor.org/html/death/US/massey706.htm

http://darkoutpost.com/history/crime-history-jason-massey-serial-killer-fan-turned-teen-murderer-executed-in-2001/

https://www.chron.com/news/houston-texas/article/Convicted-murderer-Jason-Massey-executed-2054935.php

http://www.shotsmag.co.uk/feature_view.aspx?FEATURE_ID=133

https://mylifeofcrime.wordpress.com/2015/04/14/monsters-among-us-jason-massey-killed-brian-king-and-christina-benjamin-in-his-quest-to-be-a-serial-killer-executed-432001/

Heartless: The Crimes of Steven Nelson

Clint Dobson 1
Northpoint Pastor Clint Dobson

Few places are as empty as a church on Thursday. March 3, 2011, there were only two people working at Northpoint Baptist Church on Brown Blvd: Pastor Clint Dobson, 28 and church secretary Judy Elliot, 67. Clint Dobson had been a pastor at the church for three years. Young and enthusiastic, he was equally at home discussing the Office or Seinfield with the younger church members as he was talking over the deep spiritual concerns of the more senior members. It wasn’t unusual for people to appear at the church doors looking for help. Although the front door was kept locked, no one seeking help would be turned away.

We don’t know everything about what happened that day, but we do know that both Clint and Judy were at work by 8:30 that morning. Northpoint is a satellite church of First Baptist Arlington. The L-shaped building is shared by another small church. That church also had two people present. We know they didn’t hear anything unusual, but they did notice Judy Elliot’s car, a white Mitsubishi Galant, was gone sometime between noon and one.

We know that Judy’s husband became increasingly concerned when no one answered the phone at the church. He went to the church and discovered his wife’s car was missing and no one would answer the door. He called another church member who had a key. Through a window, the men believed they could see a pair of men’s shoes and immediately called the police around 4 pm.

They found a horrific scene. Both Clint Dobson and Judy Elliot were on the floor, hands and feet trussed up behind them. They were severely beaten and plastic bags had been tied over their heads with a black electrical cord and masking tape. The responding officer and Judy’s husband hurriedly opened the bags. Clint was deceased but Judy was still alive, although severely injured. Her jaw was broken and all her teeth had been knocked out. Her face was so swollen and disfigured, that her own husband could only identify her by her clothing. She was mumbling incoherently.

Clint had been deceased for an hour or more. The medical examiner would later testify that he survived a horrific beating in which he sustained 21 separate injuries, but the plastic bag had been placed so tightly over his head that he sucked in the plastic and slowly suffocated.

Judy was unable to help police. She hovered on the brink of death in ICU. While at the hospital, she coded twice and her injuries were so severe she needed a blood transfusion.
The office had clearly been ransacked. Judy’s purse and car were missing as was Clint’s phone and laptop. Police began tracking Judy Elliot’s credit cards. They learned her cards were used to buy items at The Parks, an Arlington Mall on the same day as the murder. Someone purchased jewelry and shoes. Surveillance video showed two men using the cards.

Peggy
Judy Elliot

At the same time detectives were obtaining the surveillance footage, other officers were interviewing two women who had come forward. The women told Arlington Police that a pair of their acquaintances, had been laughing about the murder. The women said that when a news story came on the television regarding the murder of an Arlington pastor, both men made “inappropriate comments” and flashed items they claimed belonged to the pastor. The women further said that the men had been trying to rob people recently and that Nelson had new shoes and clothing. Police now had names and soon they had photo graphs to match up to the surveillance video. The person using Judy Elliot’s credit cards within hours of her near fatal beating was Stephen Lewayne Nelson.

anthony springs
Anthony Gregory Springs

Within hours of learning this information, Arlington PD arrested Anthony Gregory Springs, the man who was with Nelson. Springs had Clint’s cell phone and the keys to Judy Elliot’s car. He told police that he didn’t participate in the killing, but that Nelson had picked him up in the white Mitsubishi Gallant around 2 pm. Nelson told him he had killed a man and probably the woman as well. They went to the mall and Nelson bought items for them both with the credit cards. He said Nelson had given him Clint’s phone.

Springs actually had an alibi for the time of the murders. Police were able to confirm his alibi and cell phone records would later confirm he wasn’t in the area at the time of the robbery and murder. That isn’t to say Springs was any kind of saint. He has been in prison since this for another aggravated robbery. He was out there committing crimes, but he was no Stephen Nelson.

March 3, 2011 marked the intersection of two lives, two men on very different trajectories. Twenty-eight year old Clint Dobson was a man of faith and he believed in putting his faith into action. He was actively involved in trying to make the world a better place. He had fallen in love and married. He had gone to Seminary to become a pastor. Friends and family also remember him as someone who was warm, outgoing, with a great sense of humor. He once described his “super power” as being the “world’s best parallel parker.”

Nelson
Stephen LeWayne Nelson

Twenty-four year old Stephen Nelson had just been released from an in-patient treatment program. He already had an impressive criminal history starting from the age of 13 years old. He served juvenile probations and had been sent to TYC. His most recent troubles were from May 2010 after he had strangled and pulled a knife on his then girlfriend. This wasn’t the first attempt at turning Nelson’s life around and he was good at tell the counselors what they wanted to hear. His counselor wrote that Nelson had made great strides in anger control and learning how to work for things instead of grabbing at “fast money.” Nelson wrote that he knew how to keep from going back to jail. He completed the anger control counseling days before the murder. He was still on probation for the violent assault.

Between the murder and the arrest, more witnesses came forward. At 1:45, just more than an hour after the murder, Nelson sold Clint’s laptop to a man at a tire shop. The next day when the news broke, the man brought the laptop in to the police. He had thought the man who sold him the computer was Clint because all the paperwork in the laptop bag had that name on it. Two women at a QT were approached by a heavily tattooed man with dollar signs on his eyelids who showed them a phone and said it came from “that dead preacher in Arlington.” Nelson has dollar signs tattooed on his eyelids.

A woman named Brittany Bursey came forward to say that Nelson, Springs, and her nephew showed up at her house in a white Mitsubishi Gallant the afternoon of the murder. Nelson was introduced to her as “Romeo.” Springs told her that the car was stolen and Nelson had cards. He was offering to buy free gas for everyone. When she questioned Nelson, he admitting that he had “hit a lick,” which is street slang for robbery. He told her that “somebody was strangled and somebody got beat half to death…I think I killed her, too.” She described his demeanor as “Nonchalant. He didn’t really show any emotion or any care about anything.”

That night, Nelson went clubbing with his girlfriend. She testified that he was normal that night, untroubled.

Police located Nelson at his mother’s home just blocks from the church. He barricaded himself inside, but police were able to talk him out.

Nelson might be contained in jail, but he wasn’t’ safe, not by a long shot. While in jail he broke light bulbs, flooded his cell, threatened jailers and assaulted one of them. He flew into a rage during a visit. He was found in possession of a shank, narcotics, and even razor blades. All of that pales in response to what he did to Johnathan Holden. Holden was incarcerated in the same cell block as Nelson. His crime was breaking into a car, most likely to sleep. Holden suffered from mental illness and often ended up arrested for petty crimes.

TCSO pic.png
Nelson after fighting TCSO deputies.

According to the other inmates, Nelson tricked Holden into helping him with a “fake suicide attempt” to get the guards attention. Holden stood in front of the cell bars and let Nelson loop a blanket around his neck. Instead of the fake attempt, Nelson strangled Holden. He held him there until his legs stopped kicking, then grabbed a broomstick and celebrated by performing a “Chuck Berry Dance” on top of a table by using the broomstick like a guitar.

Nelson would insist Holden had committed suicide, but his DNA was under Holden’s nails as he had tried to escape once he realized Nelson’s intentions.

Nelson testified at his own trial. He claimed that Springs and another man went inside and remained outside. They did the crime while he waited outside.  But he was forced to admit that he went inside after the attack.  When he was arrested, police found his bloody shoes in his mother’s house. He had stepped in Clint and Judy’s blood. It was splattered on his shoes and he left his tracks at the murder scene. He also left fingerprints inside the church office and some white, metal studs which came off his belt. The studs were good evidence that he had been part of a violent struggle, especially when phone forensics placed the men he accused at another location at the time of the crime.

Nelson tried to claim they were still alive and he just stepped around them to rob them. His attorney had to prompt him. “Did you feel bad about that?” He agreed that he did.  He showed no emotion while discussing it. He couldn’t even fake the emotion in front of the jury. Unsurprisingly, he was found guilty in only 90 minutes. The evidence was overwhelming.

Upon being convicted, however, he showed emotion for the first time: rage. He was taken to the holdover cell behind he courtroom. He howled and screamed and managed to break the sprinkler system with his bare hands. The courtroom began flooding with black water as court personnel rushed to grab boxes of evidence off the ground and subdue Nelson. The day before his trial resumed, he was found to have razor blades in his possession.

At the punishment phase, the jury heard all about Nelson’s behavior in jail, including the murder of Holden. He wasn’t even safe behind bars.

Nelson’s attorneys claimed that he had never gotten the help he needed. He first acted out at the age of 3 when he set his mother’s bed on fire. They pointed out that his father was incarcerated most of Nelson’s life and was a negative influence. Nelson got into trouble with Oklahoma juvenile authorities at the age of 6. Ronnie Meeks, with the Office of Juvenile Affairs in Oklahoma, testified that Nelson finally ended up in the custody of Juvenile Affairs while they tried to rehabilitate him. Once, Nelson stole Meeks’ truck while he was being transported from one facility to another. Meeks remembered Nelson well. “That’s the thing I remember about Steven. I don’t remember ever seeing any remorse about anything.”

Nelson moved to Texas with his mother and siblings. Mary Kelleher, a psychologist and juvenile services supervisor, testified that Nelson’s criminal history in Texas dates to 2000 when he was 13. At 14 he was committed to the Texas Youth Commission. Even at that young age, he was  unrepentant. When she asked him why he kept committing crimes, he just said that he was bored.

She also testified about his home life. His mother tried, but was very frustrated by Steven. She did everything she could. He had two siblings who turned out fine, but from an early age, Nelson seemed destined to a life of crime. The jury sentenced Nelson to die by lethal injection. He has exhausted all appeals and remains defiant, writing poetry from behind bars. I’ve read it and it isn’t bad poetry. I say that as a former English teacher. But it’s self-indulgent and narcissistic. Every poem is about him because that is how Steven Nelson sees the world.

Two men. One whose epitaph reads “He was generous of heart, constant of faith, and joyful of spirit.”

The other who took that joyful life. Unrepentant. Cold. Heartless.

StevenLawayneNelsonsmaller
AP Photo/Michael Graczyk

SOURCE NOTES: Here are some of the public articles I relied on in my investigation. In addition I reviewed some of the primary sources such as reports and photographs which may be obtained with open records requests.

http://www.star-telegram.com/news/local/community/arlington/article18655806.html

http://murderpedia.org/male.N/n/nelson-steven.html

https://www.texastribune.org/library/data/texas-prisons/units/polunsky/

http://www.mcclatchydc.com/news/crime/article24738796.html

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/rev-clinton-dobson-murder-felon-found-guilty-of-capital-murder-in-texas-pastors-suffocation-death/

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/rev-clinton-dobson-update-two-charged-with-suffocation-murder-of-texas-pastor/

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/texas-pastor-rev-clinton-dobson-suffocated-in-deadly-robbery-say-arlington-police/

https://www.dallasnews.com/news/arlington/2011/03/07/men-arrested-in-arlington-pastors-death-laughed-and-bragged-court-papers-say

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1363019/Minister-dead-inside-Texas-church-body-spotted-window.html

Garden of Angels: The Murder of Amy Robinson

In the northeast corner of Tarrant County, tucked at the end of a rough roadway, there is a field of crosses, each cross remembering a life stolen by violent crime. Hours of labor have transformed that weed-choked field into Our Garden of Angels, a place of peace and remembrance with paths, benches, and a gurgling waterfall. Families gather there occasionally, just to be in a calm place where they don’t have to shoulder the burden of grief alone. There, they are among those who truly understand.

This unique memorial for murder victims began with a single cross to remember a beautiful, young woman named Amy Robinson.

Amy-Robinson.jpg

Nineteen year old Amy Robinson had dreams of going to college and becoming a teacher, but that hope was far away. She was doing well learning to live on her own and hold a job. Amy had been born with Turner’s syndrome, a chromosomal disorder which inhibits physical and mental growth. She was extremely petite, only four feet five inches and she had the mental capacity of a 14 year old. But she was learning how to live on her own and every day she rode her bicycle to her job sacking groceries for Kroger in Arlington, Texas. Amy was sweet and trusting. She was very social and didn’t like to be alone and had no reason to be suspicious when two of her co-workers stopped to offer her a ride on her way to work one day.

Robert Neville, Jr. and Michael Hall had both been fired by Kroger, but Amy didn’t know that. Two hours after she was supposed to be at work, her supervisor called to say Amy had never arrived. Alarmed, her family called police immediately. Police spoke with current and former co-workers. Neville admitted knowing her and even meeting her socially, but he denied having seen her in months.

Neville was someone Amy would never have trusted if only she’d known his background. He had prior convictions for burglary and had only been out of prison for 8 months. As a juvenile, he had been prosecuted for molesting younger children including an 11 year old girl, a 9 year old boy, and a 7 year old boy. He also had a history of abusing animals. When Neville was 14, he threw kittens off a roof. Two years later he tied a cat to a tree by its tail and repeatedly hit the cat with a pole. He had been fired for ridiculing a mentally challenged co-worker and had refused to sack groceries for minority shoppers. He had a fascination with white supremacy. That was the tie that bound Neville and Hall together.

Hall also didn’t like people of color. He was a follower, not a leader, and he was happy to let Neville take the lead. As they were drinking at a house belonging to Neville’s grandmother, Neville mentioned how he would like to go “just go out and kill somebody.” Hall suggested they purchase guns. They bought a pair of .22 caliber rifles and practiced shooting. They formed a plan to be serial killers and selected their first victim, a mentally impaired black man whom they worked with. Neville would later claim in a Fort Worth Star-Telegram interview that they had “a bet to see who could shoot and kill the most people between the two of us.” They particularly wanted to kill “blacks or Mexicans—anybody as long as they weren’t our color.”

On February 15, 1998, the duo made a decision. Upon checking the work schedules, they learned the black coworker wasn’t going to be at work that day, but Amy would be and she was part Native American. They found her riding her bike to work and offered her a ride which she accepted. These weren’t strangers to her and she didn’t know they had been fired. They promised her that they were going to take a ride and then they would drop her off. Instead of taking her to work, they drove her to a field in the Northeast corner of Tarrant County, an isolated place tucked off a rough, pitted road. Amy worried she would be late for work.

Neville stopped at the field, pretending to have a flat tire. Neville and Hall took their weapons out into the field while Amy sat in the car listening to the radio until Hall came back. He convinced her that she needed to go talk to Neville, that he was waiting for her over by a tree. Neville was waiting for Amy, and he was armed with a crossbow. He shot at her several times, grazing her hair with an arrow. She fled for the car but Hall shot her with a pellet gun in the leg. She cried from the pain as he began peppering her with pellets. Neville then brought up the .22 caliber rifle. They took turns shooting Amy. Neville shot her in the chest with the rifle and Hall shot her in the chest multiple times with the pellet gun.

She went to the ground, shaking and crying, then she called Neville by name. It was the last thing Amy would ever say. The pair became worried someone would overhear them so Neville shot Amy in the head to finish her. They had maneuvered her back into the field where she wouldn’t be readily visible from the road. They abandoned her body and left her bicycle with her.

Meanwhile, Amy’s family and friends were frantically looking for her. Her face stayed on the nightly news. It occurred to Hall and Neville that they might have missed a chance to rob Amy, so they went back to her body and took the small amount of cash from her pocket. They then used her body for target practice.

As so many narcissists do, Hall just had to brag about what they had done. He told his step-brother who went to the Arlington police. As police focused on Neville and Hall, they made for the border, but were arrested in Eagle Pass trying to cross into Mexico on March 3rd. Once detained, both men spent a lot of time boasting to reporters and investigators. They openly laughed about torturing Amy. Hall went so far as to imitate the sounds she was make and act out his shooting of her. He described how she begged to live, but died with Robert Neville’s name on her lips.

The interviews would come back to haunt them. Both men claimed diminished mental capacity as a defense, but the juries saw the videos of them laughing it up about torturing and killing Amy. The described her as “easy prey” and talked about how they wanted to be serial killers. Hall specifically mentioned that they chose Amy “because I didn’t have to put bruises on her to get her in the car.”  He bragged about being the one to convince Amy that she was safe with them and even getting her to leave the car and walk over to Neville. He said she might have gotten away if he hadn’t been there to help Neville.  Asked if he had any remorse, on the Fox 4 video that was played, he laughed and said “I wouldn’t want to be her. She had to take a lot of pain.”  The juries sentenced both men to death.

Amy’s grandmother, Carolyn Barker wasn’t satisfied. For her, the media was too focused on the perpetrators and not on the victim. It seemed to her that Hall and Neville wanted to be famous. Every time the murder was covered, she had to look at their faces, hear their words, listen to everyone talk about their upbringings and mental status. What about Amy? Amy was the one who should be remembered.

cross

Carolyn went to find the place in the weed-choked field where Amy had died. She says that part of her Native American beliefs are that a person’s spirit separates from the body and ascends to the afterlife at the place of death and that place becomes sacred. She marked that sacred spot with a cross. Amy had never liked being alone, and when other families in a grief support group expressed interest, she encouraged them to place their crosses beside Amy’s. This was no ordinary support group, but Families of Murdered Victims, and from there the unique memorial to crime victims was born.

Neville was executed February 8, 2006. Hall was executed February 15, 2011, thirteen years to the day from when he murdered Amy Robinson. Although it was financially and emotionally draining, Amy’s mother and sisters made the journey to see the executions. Her grandmother Carolyn did not, choosing instead to celebrate Amy’s life among her fellow angels. Her mother Tina said that she needed to see their final justice for herself. Both men expressed regret and apologized to the families.

Neville claimed to have become a Christian and told them he would see Amy on the other side and apologize to her and tell her how much her family loved and missed her. Hall also claimed to have found Christianity and said he wished he could make things right.  Amy’s sisters weren’t interested in forgiving him. Amanda expressed that she believed he was not remorseful but playing for cameras right to the end. Ruth said she felt like a weight had been lifted from her and she was glad Hall died the same day Amy did. It felt right to her.

From the four original crosses, Amy’s field is now home to more than 160 crosses, tangible reminders of lives taken in violence. Carolyn Barker’s love for her granddaughter transformed her grief into something beautiful. She wanted Amy’s memory to live on and she has succeeded. The memorial has been named Our Garden of Angels. You can take a visual tour from their website and read more about some of the precious lives remembered there at http://ourgardenofangels.org/.

 

 

 

SOURCE NOTES:

http://ourgardenofangels.org/

http://www.clarkprosecutor.org/html/death/US/neville1011.htm

Neville’s Appeals: Neville v. Dretke, Not Reported in F.Supp.2d, 2004 WL 2049335 (N.D. Tex. 2004) (Habeas)
Neville v. Dretke, 423 F.3d 474 (5th Cir. 2005) (Habeas)

http://caselaw.findlaw.com/us-5th-circuit/1209854.html

http://www.murderpedia.org/male.N/n1/neville-robert-james.htm

Hall v. State, 67 S.W.3d 870 (Tex.Crim.App. 2002). (Direct Appeal)
Hall v. Texas, 537 U.S. 802, 123 S.Ct. 70 (2002). (Remand)
Hall v. State, 160 S.W.3d 24 (Tex.Crim.App. 2004). (Direct Appeal After Remand)
Hall v. Quarterman, 534 F.3d 365 (5th Cir. 2008). (Habeas)

http://www.murderpedia.org/male.H/images/h/hall_michael_wayne/06-70041-CV.pdf

http://www.murderpedia.org/male.H/h1/hall-michael-wayne.htm